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How Apple Pay Works

Apple Pay is convenient, fast, and it seemingly works without incident … until you check your debit card bill. It seems that Apple Pay users haveĀ been charged twice for every single purchase made with Apple Pay at various stores. It seems the common denominator, is the use of a Bank of America debit card. When asked, Bank of America support assured it’s customers it is a problem on Apple Pay’s end, not Bank of America.

When asked, Apple Pay customer support kindly reminds their customers that for security purposes, Apple keeps zero records of names or amounts of any transactions. In essence, there is nothing Apple can do about it. Apple support then recomends that their customer call Bank of America. This sound familiar? The old run-around routine. Luckily, Bank of America is ready and willing to reverse these obviously duplicate charges with little hassle.

 

Just remember, check your bank statements after using Apple Pay!

 

Apple Pay works by allowing users to simply tap their iPhone devices to payment terminals and then touch their devices’ fingerprint sensors to purchase items. Both the devices and the terminals must have near-field communication (NFC) chips that store payment credentials — something that limits the in-store service to the new iPhone 6 and 6 Plus phones, as well as the Apple Watch when it hits the market next year.

But Apple Pay has another component that doesn’t require an NFC chip but does need the company’s TouchID. People now can pay for items in apps using a single touch on their device’s fingerprint sensor, something that removes time and the hassle of entering credit card and address information over and over. Previously, Apple allowed consumers to use the fingerprint sensor to quickly buy content just from its iTunes, App and iBooks stores. Online shopping within apps works with Apple’s new iPhones and watch, as well as the new iPad Air 2 and iPad Mini 3.

 

Apple Pay